From - Thu Sep 10 20:42:56 1998
Subject: recent international news of interest

If you cannot access the Web but want the complete article email me. Additionally, if you know of any good sources for indices of international coverage which I'm missing let me know.

Notes: I find it interesting how overseas coverage does two things. One, it highlights what is the prevailing Australian media myth of the moment, i.e. 'race-based election'. Two, it sometimes cuts to the quick with a dispassionate eye, i.e. the Financial Times' headline of 'Australian law passed to curb aborigine land rights - Approval of legislation helps clear way for delayed Telstra sell-off'. Also: despite their coverage of the rise of Hanson, in two stories at my count, CNN has yet to cover 'The Deal' or much else except sport to do with Australia over the last two months. Perhaps the support of Pat Buchanan, standard bearer for the Republican far-right, for Pauline Hanson will change things.

Paul

[DAiLY TELEGRAPH] Odd couple of the outback http://www.telegraph.co.uk:80/et?ac=000576817733552&rtmo=wneMflfb&atmo=99999999&pg=/et/98/7/4/tloutb04.html Saturday 4 July 1998 She is a former convent girl who grew up in Devon; he is an Aborigine with a prison record. Now they have made their home in the Great Sandy Desert. Report by David Rennie LIKE so many other British children, when Pat Lowe was at convent school in Devon, she dreamed of digging through the Earth and coming up in Australia. She did not forget the dream, and the red sands and vast blue skies of the outback continued to haunt her thoughts, even as she carved out a successful career as a young prison psychologist. Unlike so many others, Pat has achieved her dream, to an extraordinary degree. For the past 10 years, she has roamed the Great Sandy Desert in Australia's far north-west. Her guide has been her de facto husband, an Aboriginal artist named Jimmy Pike, whom she met through her work, as he served prison terms for car theft, and then murder.

[DAiLY TELEGRAPH] Aborigine land rights cut by close Senate vote Thursday 9 July 1998 http://www.telegraph.co.uk:80/et?ac=000576817733552&rtmo=LdxK3hdd&atmo=99999999&pg=/et/98/7/9/waus09.html By Barbie Dutter in Sydney THE Australian government's Aboriginal land rights reforms, watering down Aborigines' rights to government pastures leased to farmers, were finally passed by the Senate yesterday.

[DAiLY TELEGRAPH] Conquerors with a bit of a conscience http://www.telegraph.co.uk:80/et?ac=000576817733552&rtmo=LdxK3hdd&atmo=99999999&pg=/et/98/5/9/botribe09.html Saturday 9 May 1998 Paul Johnson questions an orthodox study of colonial expansion Rivers of Blood, Rivers of Gold: Europe's Conflict with Tribal Peoples by Mark Cocker Jonathan Cape In Australia, it was fortunate for the aborigines that the British arrived there before the French, Dutch or indeed Javanese, who have a sorry record in the various Indonesian islands they have taken over. Thanks to British colonial governors, the aborigines, a fragile race, just contrived to survive, and in time to flourish again.

[DAiLY TELEGRAPH] A passionate account of colonialisation is readable, knowledgable - and simplistic, argues Paul Johnson Saturday 11 July 1998 http://www.telegraph.co.uk:80/et?ac=000576817733552&rtmo=LdxK3hdd&atmo=99999999&pg=/et/98/7/11/boearth11.html The Earth Shall Weep: a History of Native America by James Wilson. Picador OVER the past half-century, an effort has been made to rewrite the history of the Europeanisation of the world. The "colonialist" version has been pushed to one side, and alternative "native" versions substituted, putting the point of view of the Maoris in New Zealand, the Bantus in South Africa, the Aborigines in Australia and the Red Indians in North America, to give four notable examples. This rewriting of history has been accompanied by successful campaigns for "land rights" and other legal advantages which have recompensed the dispossessed races materially. Or so it is argued. In reality, nobody has benefited, except possibly the small number of "native" intellectuals and the much larger number of white middle-class academics who manipulate them.

[DAiLY TELEGRAPH] Jews expose One Nation supporters Friday 10 July http://www.telegraph.co.uk:80/et?ac=000576817733552&rtmo=pSs14MIe&atmo=99999999&pg=/et/98/7/10/waus10.html By Barbie Dutter in Sydney A ROW has erupted over the decision by a Jewish magazine to publish the names of 2,000 members and financial supporters of Australia's anti-immigration One Nation party.

ASSOCIATED PRESS Australia Rightists List Published http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/i/AP-Australia-Jews-Lists.html July 9, 1998 CANBERRA, Australia (AP) -- Holocaust survivors angrily criticized a Jewish magazine's decision to publish names from a right-wing party's membership list, saying Thursday it reminds them of Nazi-era attacks on privacy and other freedoms.

ASSOCIATED PRESS Senate restricts Aboriginal land rights, but struggle will continue Friday July 10 http://www.boston.com/dailynews/wirehtml/189/Senate_restricts_Aboriginal_land_ri.htm By Alan Thornhill, Associated Press CANBERRA, Australia (AP) - Australia's Senate voted Wednesday to restrict the claims of Aborigines to vast government lands leased to ranchers, farmers and miners.

REUTERS Cries of 'Shame' Greet Rollback of Australia's Aboriginal Land Rights Law July 8 http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/world/070898/australialand.sml By Terry Friel CANBERRA Australia's parliament passed a law on Wednesday that winds back Aboriginal land rights, averting a race-based snap election that could have handed the balance of power to populist politician Pauline Hanson.

FINANCIAL TIMES Australian law passed to curb aborigine land rights Approval of legislation helps clear way for delayed Telstra sell-off THURSDAY JULY 9 1998 http://www.ft.com/hippocampus/q57672.htm writes Russell Baker in Sydney Australia's federal parliament yesterday finally passed controversial legislation which curbs the land rights of aborigines, averting the risk of an early race-based general election.

[San Jose Mercury News] Australia's issues could be our issues Wednesday, July 8, 1998 http://www.sjmercury.com/opinion/top/buchanan.htm By Pat Buchanan IF A TREE falls in a forest in Australia, out of earshot, does it make a sound? That old teaser is more than a party riddle today. For the tree falling in Australia is the conservative coalition of Prime Minister John Howard. And the ax chopping at the foot of that tree is the One Nation populist party, the talk of all Australia.

BBC World: Asia-Pacific Sweeteners for Aussie voters Friday, July 10 http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/world/asia-pacific/newsid_129000/129961.stm The Australian government has announced two large investment programmes in what ministers admit is an attempt to win back support from voters who've defected to an extreme right-wing party.

:|: Paul Canning :|: canning@rainbow.net.au :|: http://www.rainbow.net.au/~canning
Queers for reconciliation http://reconciliation.queer.org.au/
"We would be better off with straight MPs who support equality than with gay MPs who endorse discrimination against gays, lesbians and people with HIV." Outrage (UK)